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Boredom is the Result of Ineffective Processes

There is no question that doing business can be more complicated than ever. But many owners and managers operate in a process vacuum. There’s nothing more worthless than a perfunctory executive meeting where everyone just goes through the motions and no strategic decisions are made. Over the years, how often were there times when sheer boredom was the only item accomplished on the agenda? Every business has their own style and culture, but some patterns of behavior inspire people to perform. Here are five real-world lessons to avoid the process vacuum. 1) Remove the blinders and see where you are. The most important part of a process is articulating the vision; where you are and where you need to be. In an effective business process, managers rise above the paperwork to have clarity of the process and navigate through the activities that lead to a specific result.  2) Don’t lose your sense of humor. There‚Äôs a huge difference between serious business decisions with big implications and taking yourself too seriously. People and teams are more effective and make better decisions when the mood is lightened. 3) Hard work is the best inspiration. Objects in motion are more likely to stay in […]

How Do You Measure Up?

As we approach the end of the year most of us formally or informally, take some time to review current year and look towards the next. By now most large companies have completed next year’s budgets and established sales goals, and are probably are almost finished with updating their dashboards and report templates to be able to measure next year’s sales. Its good business and most would agree that drives achievement. Then why, according to the 4th Annual Staples National Business Survey, did more than 80% of the 300 small business owners surveyed say they don’t keep track of their business goals, and 77% have yet to achieve their vision for their company? With that statistic, it should be no real surprise that individuals have similar statistics. According to Dave Kohl, professor emeritus at Virginia Tech, 80% of Americans say they don’t have goals, 16% do have goals but don’t write them down, and fewer than 1% review them on an ongoing basis. Why don’t small businesses and individuals create, write-down, and review goals regularly? I am fairly certain that it is not because small businesses and individuals look for ways to fail and not achieve success. I believe two […]